3 Ways to Reduce Tension

When practicing Tai Chi, Qigong or stretching, our main goal should be to first identify an area of warmth or resistance, then secondly remove the resistance.  Ideally, the removal of tension should be more than physical.  Our body is incredibly adaptive, and once the tension has found a home, our tissue quickly remembers.  Here are a few tools to break the ‘pattern’ of tension in the body.

  1.  Identify the tension.  For most, we never take the time to actually recognize that a part of our body is stressed.  Simply bringing attention to the resistance can release the holding.
  2. Breath into the tension.  If identifying the tension doesn’t trigger a release, next bring ‘breath’ to the area of resistance.  As you breath in deeply, imagine expansion in the area affected by the tension.  Visualize the area expanding, as if blowing up a balloon.  A few breathes in and out may be enough to release the tissue or blockage.
  3. Contract/release the tissue.  Lastly, if the tension still persists, bring a slight contraction to the area.  Once you regain control of the tissue, then fully release.

Muscle tension and holding patterns can be very strong, so be persistent with your practice and you’ll soon realize a healthier, freer body.

Summer Class Schedule

As movement classes begin in July, be sure to sign-up on-line, as class sizes are limited to 10.  Here’s a run down of the schedule for Tai Chi, Qigong, Meditation and Dynamic Integration.

Monday
– Tai Chi / Qigong — 12:15pm
– Qigong Meditation — 5:15pm
– Dynamic Integration — 5:30pm

Tuesday
– Dynamic Integration — 12:15pm
– Qigong Meditation — 5:15pm
– Tai Chi / Qigong — 5:30pm

Wednesday
– Dynamic Integration — 6:15am
– Tai Chi / Qigong — 12:15pm

Thursday
– Tai Chi / Qigong — 6:15am
– Dynamic Integration — 12:15pm

Looking forward to seeing you in July!

Scheduler Now Open — Tai Chi, Qigong, & Dynamic Integration

Tai Chi, Qigong, & Dynamic Integration available now to schedule.

Classes begin in July.  Here’s the format for each:

Tai Chi / Qigong — 45 min ($10)

Dynamic Integration — 45 min ($10)

Qigong Meditation — 15 min (Free)

Drop-in rate is $10.  If you plan on attending 2 or more sessions/week, I’ll be offering unlimited classes in July at a special rate of $75.

For the time being, movement classes will be cash/check only, payable at the beginning of class.

I intend on working out a pre-pay or per-week payment scenario as I see interest growing.

Looking forward to seeing you there!

Vote Now — What times are best for Tai Chi, Qigong, and Movement Classes

As July approaches, I’m settling in on a schedule for movement classes.  Take a second and vote below for your preferred time or times.  You can also ‘write in’ a time under the ‘other’ option.  If you’re unable to click on the polling image, be sure to leave your choice in the ‘reply’ section at the bottom of the page.  Thanks!

What times are best for movement classes?
Mornings 6:15am
Afternoons 12:15pm
Evenings 5:30pm
Other
Please Specify:

quotes 2 know

Video — Qigong for Hand and Elbow Symptoms

If you’re experiencing numb/tingling hands or burning on the inside of the elbow, try this Qigong exercise to find relief.  ‘Nerve pain’ is often caused by an entrapment of tight muscle and bound fascia.  A daily practice is important to keep these tissues healthy; try to find time (5 – 10 minutes) while at work, to pull away from the computer and move.

Classes will be available July 2017 and scheduling will be available June 2017.  Be sure to sign up and learn more about this great healing tool.

Body Awareness Through Tai Chi

Structural Integration does a great job of making immediate and profound changes in muscle tone, suppleness and posture over the course of just one session.  Although the changes are long-term, when clients neglect to make habitual changes in their work and play routines, the restrictions will return over the course of weeks and months.

One way to supplement your structural integration session is to increase body awareness through Tai Chi.  When practicing Tai Chi, students will learn to identify when a particular muscle is over-used and simply release the tension on their own.  Thus, learning to move through everyday life with minimal effort.  The net result is a more graceful and effortless movement that will prove to decrease symptoms and increase energy.

Classes will begin July 2017.  Scheduling will be available June 2017.

Is Structural Integration the same as Rolfing?

This is a question I’m asked all the time, and it has a long but simple answer.  Structural Integration is a type of bodywork; ‘Rolfing’ is one of several ‘brands’ of Structural Integration.  ‘Rolfing’ is the original brand of structural integration developed by Ida Rolf.  The term ‘Rolfer’ is given only to practitioners who complete their training at the Rolf Institute and is a trademarked name.  ‘Rolfers’, the same as all structural integrators, are representing the work of Ida Rolf and her structural integration bodywork.

I trained with another school of structural integration (the CORE Institute) based out of Tallahassee, FL.  Currently there are several schools in the country teaching structural integration:  The Rolf Institute, The Guild For Structural Integration, The Soma Institute, The CORE Institute, and KMI are the most recognized.  All of these programs’ teachings are based off of Ida Rolf’s original work and most are extending her work as our understanding of fascia and movement increases.

As a group of professionals, structural integrators, whether from the Rolf Institute or any other school, are brought together by the International Association of Structural Integration (IASI), which serves to broaden our knowledge, consolidate our teachings and create a standard of practice for all Structural Integrators.

Beyond Pain Management

As our bodies age, joints start to creak and muscles start to ache, at some point we resign ourselves to the ‘fact ??’ that we just have to live with this pain.  Options like medications and even surgery seem to be viable options to help us endure the pain.

I don’t believe we need to lower our expectations of the life that we want to live.  The 50′s and 60′s and 70+ are the times we should be able to enjoy the fruits of hard work put out during the ‘prime’ of life.

When the body starts to ‘hurt’, the nervous system is doing exactly what its suppose to do; sending us a signal that something needs cared for.  By relying on things like medication and even some surgeries, we’re treating the nervous system and not truly caring for the body.  Essentially, its like cutting the wires from under the dash of your car that is causing the warning lights to go off.  The light stops blinking, but the car is still not running right.

We use structural integration to address the reason for the pain signal… not just make the pain signal go away.  I believe the biggest difference between structural integration and our use of medication/surgery is this:  living a healthy life versus living a life in the absence of disease.

Preparing for your Structural Integration session

As I work with more and more clients, a few thoughts generally come up that help me create an efficient plan to move forward.
Here are a few things to consider when scheduling a structural integration session.

1)  frequency, intensity and duration of a symptom
2)  do you have movement limitations
– what is stopping/pulling/blocking your movement
– when does the limitation occur (upon waking in the a.m., after work, while exercising)
3)  are you at a plateau in your yoga practice, athletic endeavor, daily exercise program
4)  do you see others doing movements you’d like to be able to do

The more information you can bring to your session, the better results we’ll achieve.

Up ↑